Michael D. Gumert
Assistant Professor
Email (add @ntu.edu.sg):

Gumert
Office Location:

HSS-04-05, 14 Nanyang drive

Office phone number:
+65 65141094 

Primary Area of Focus:
Primate Behavior and Socioecology 

Research Summary:

  • Social Exchange and Cooperation – Aspects of Dr. Gumert’s research explores the role of dominance forces, kinship ties, and market effects on patterns of social exchange. Of greatest interest, is how short-term changes in demography affect the availability and demand for cooperative partners. This line of research is uncovering how biological markets act on primate social systems, with a major focus on identifying how individuals alter their behavior towards conspecifics based on the proximate social conditions surrounding them.
  • Lithic Culture and Tool-use – Dr. Gumert is currently most involved in studying a population of long-tailed macaques in Thailand that customarily use stones to process and consume mollusks, crustaceans, and various types of nuts. Research on this population of macaques is currently identifying the diversity of food sources, usage styles and handgrips used with stones. Of particular interest is how the environment (i.e, stones chosen, habitats, and food types) and social learning affect these patterns. This work is also beginning to link into the field of Primate Archeology, which explores the Primate origins of lithic cultures and the basis of human technology.
  • Human-Macaque Conflict – Long-tailed macaques have lived in close association to humans since pre-historic times. In the midst of the modern environmental collapse, conflict between humans and macaques across SE Asia appears to be increasing, which is creating new stressors on long-tailed macaque populations throughout the region. Dr. Gumert has been at the forefront of trying to understand the factors that lead to these wildlife conflicts and how such conflict impacts macaques and humans. Over the past few years, he has been trying to develop public discourse on strategies that can be used in Asia to humanely ameliorate human-macaque conflict and foster symbiotic human-macaque communities where possible.

 

Published Books:



Project: http://sites.google.com/site/thaiseamonkey/home

Selected Publications:

1. Gumert M.D., Malaivijitnond S. (in press). Marine prey processed with stone tools by Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea) in intertidal habitats. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. (IF 2.824)

2. Gumert, M.D., Hamada, Y., Malaivijitnond S. (in press) Human activity negatively affects wild stone tool-using Burmese long-tailed macaques Macaca fascicularis aurea in Laemson National Park, Thailand. Oryx. (IF 1.826)

3. Gumert, M.D., Low, K.H., Malaivijitnond S. (2011). Sex differences in the stone tool use behavior of a wild population of Burmese long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis aurea). American Journal of Primatology. 73: 1239-1249. (3 citations) (IF 2.221)
• Featured Article with Cover Photograph (Published with HSS FYP student)

4. Stirratt M., Gumert, M.D., Perritt D. (2011). Food sharing in a dating market: The effects of sex and mate value on provisioning preferences with potential sexual partners. Evolutionary Psychology. 9: 79-91 (1 citations) (IF 1.055)

5. Gumert M.D. (2011). An assessment of the common monkey of Southeast Asia: Long-tailed macaque populations, ethnophoresy, and their occurrence in human environments. (In: Monkeys on the edge: Ecology and management of long-tailed macaques and their interface with humans. Eds. Gumert, M.D, Jones-Engel, L, Fuentes, A.) Cambridge University Press. (Peer reviewed)

6. Gumert M.D., and Fuentes A. Engel G., Jones-Engel L., (2011) Future directions for research and conservation of long-tailed macaque populations. (In: Monkeys on the edge: Ecology and management of long-tailed macaques and their interface with humans. Eds. Gumert, M.D, Jones-Engel, L, Fuentes, A.) Cambridge University Press. (Peer-reviewed)

7. Jones-Engel L., Engel G., Gumert M.D., and Fuentes A. (2011) Developing sustainable human macaque communities. (In: Monkeys on the edge: Ecology and management of long tailed macaques and their interface with humans. Eds. Gumert, M.D, Jones-Engel, L, Fuentes, A.) Cambridge University Press. (Peer-reviewed)

8. Afendi, N., Rachmawan, D., Gumert, M.D. (2011) The long-tailed macaques of Karimunjawa (Macaca fascicularis karimondjiwae): A small and isolated subspecies threatened by human-macaque conflict. (In: Monkeys on the edge: Ecology and management of long tailed macaques and their interface with humans. Eds. Gumert, M.D, Jones-Engel, L, Fuentes, A.) Cambridge University Press. (Peer-reviewed)

9. Gumert, M.D., Jones-Engel, L, & Fuentes, A. (Editors) (2011). Monkeys on the edge: Ecology and management of long-tailed macaques and their interface with humans. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

10. Gumert, M.D. (2010). The role of reciprocity and dominance in the grooming relationships of Indonesian long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), In: Indonesian Primates (eds. Gursky, S & Supriatna, J.) Springer. (Peer reviewed)

11. Gumert, M.D.,  Kluck, M., Malaivijitnond, S. (2009). The physical characteristics and usage patterns of stone axe and pounding hammers used by long-tailed macaques in the Andaman Sea region of Thailand. American Journal of Primatology. 71, 594-608. doi: 10.1002/ajp.20694 (21 citations) (IF 2.221)

12. Sha, J.C.M., Gumert, M.D., Lee, B.P.Y-H., Jones-Engel, L. Chan, S., Fuentes, A. (2009). Macaque-human interactions and the societal perceptions of macaques in Singapore. American Journal of Primatology. 10, 825-839. doi:10.1002/ajp.20710 (13 citations) (IF 2.221)

13. Sha, J.C.M.., Gumert, M.D., Lee, B.P. Y-H., Fuentes, A., Rajathurai, S, Chan, S., Jones Engel, L. (2009). Status of the long-tailed macaque (Macaca fascicularis) in Singapore and implications for management. Biodiversity and Conservation, 18, 2909-2926. doi: 10.1007/s10531-0099616-4 (13 citations) (IF 2.238)